A Business Technology Place

Cast the bully out

We have a love-hate relationship with steering committees.

Do committees provide value that pays for the amount of overhead they create in workflows? If you are a committee member with voting privileges then the tendency is to support and agree with the both the decisions and procedural steps the committee follows. If you are a project requestor then your attitude about a steering committee is influenced by the amount of steps involved to get decisions as well as the amount of time it takes to reach a decision.

I have experience as both a committee member and a work requestor. I’ve observed both the value of a committee and the hindrance a committee can insert into workflow. A steering committee creates value when it buffers the amount of work that is given to a technology team to implement. The result of buffering work is protecting the downstream resources from becoming overburdened with too many concurrent tasks. Buffering work also prioritizes the backlog and technology team members want to work on what the business leaders designate as top priorities.

There is usually a bully, or two, that receives all of the attention of the committee.

But you’ve undoubtedly observed a myopic committee as well. There are usually one or two platforms/customers that usually receive top priority or seem get automatic approval. There is usually a direct correlation to the amount of revenue generated by the platform or customer and the committee decision.

Conflict arises when these projects take all available resources such that other projects or customers begin to starve for attention. A significant challenge exists for the employees who represent the smaller platforms and customers to be able to get work done. That’s not a good situation for the anyone. But the committee members feel justified because they have allocated resources to the work that tied to the most revenue.

Cast the bully out.

One way to remove the platform/customer that usually plays trump in the committee is to organize that work team around a hybrid technology model. In the hybrid model the business owner (product manager/customer manager) has day-to-day direction on setting priorities for the technology team. A centralized project management office can track the work backlog and work-in-progress (WIP). The business owner then reviews the WIP at the steering committee meeting to bring visibility and accountability to the direction and decisions of their group. So while the steering committee is not prioritizing work for the decentralized group, they do have visibility and the ability to influence work if needed.

This approach doesn’t work for all platforms and customers because that would mean that there are enough resources to have a dedicated technology team for each platform/customer. It does align the platform/customer work with the business line to promote a more agile approach to work. The business owners that used shared resources no longer get trumped by the bully projects. The bully projects are able to move more quickly because they don’t have the overhead of committee processing. It’s a win-win-win.

Steering Committee Bully