A Business Technology Place

Battling Urgent

Picking my battles

Every day I am tempted to work more on what’s urgent than what’s important. Somedays I do better at working on important tasks, but it’s a constant wrestling match. Important tasks help to achieve my overall goals. Urgent tasks usually involve fixing something that is broken for someone else. Urgent tasks may not always be beneficial to everyone and tend to be subject to interpretation of the one asking for something to be completed. In other words, if I ask someone how urgent something really is, I will usually receive varying answers.

For me, it all starts with a service desk ticket, a system-outage, equipment failure, unexpected email, etc. Something happens that seems to always turn my time management routine upside down. Even if I’m working on important tasks related to larger goals, there are interruptions for urgent things by way of phone, in-person office visit, text, email, etc.

7am quiet time

At one time, the 7am hour was my stress-free plan-the-day time. It was quiet and I could plan the day or work on important tasks. Nice.

But I’ve noticed lately, the battle-of-urgent is starting more often during the 7am hour. More colleagues and customers are working flex-hours and home office hours these days. That means more workers are online at 7am trying to use computing equipment or starting to go through their daily tasks and reaching out for help.

Different Perspectives

I realize my purpose at work is to help others and to connect them to solutions. So while I may have lost my 7am hour as a planning time, I need to adjust and think smarter about how to approach the battle of urgent versus important.

I also realized the reverse is true; my important tasks could be someone else’s urgent tasks. If our goals are not aligned then it’s easy to create this type of mismatch.

Battling Urgent

A great approach to time management is defining leader standard work (LSW).  When I documented my leader standard work, I defined the important activities I perform daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, annually, etc. If I plan my day around leader standard work activities I should see the following benefits:

  • Working on what’s important – LSW defines activities that are important to the execution and management of my team and work.
  • Addressing what’s urgent through assignment and delegation. Whenever possible, I should delegate urgent work.  My LSW is structured in such a way as to review work queues for the entire team and make assignment shifts or inquiries as necessary.
  • Leading by teaching – LSW should be setup to make me more visible to my team and customers not less visible because I’m hidden behind a computer screen. LSW creates opportunities for engagement with other team members and customers.
  • Reflecting and 5S – I fail most often on this task because I work until I reach that stopping point at the end of the day.  If I can take 10 minutes at the end of the day to reflect and jot down any important tasks for tomorrow then it should help towards a great start against battling urgent.

Battling urgent never ends and some days I do better than others. But I try to prepare for the battle everyday by defining what’s important first and then executing that plan.

Onward and upward.

Photo Credit: https://flic.kr/p/21aTYi5 – Marco Verch via Creative Commons.

A note to self

Dear me,

Don’t be quick to discount new ideas. All improvements for humanity and business started with a new idea. Someone saw opportunity and imagined a better result, a stronger product, or a faster way. Someone acted and made their opportunity a reality. They were not afraid of failure. They overcame doubts. They made peace with uncertainty.

Why?

Because their image of a better result made failures look like stepping stones to success.

Because the promise of a stronger product made doubting look like an admission to defeat.

Because the benefits of doing it faster outweighed the results of the status quo.

So give new ideas a chance. Challenge the status quo. Dream a little.

Keep moving onward and upward!

Sincerely,

Me

Have your job to the full

Abundant life.

I recently read a verse in the gospel of John (10:10) about having life to the full, or an abundant life. There’s an attraction to define a fully abundant life in terms of positive and uplifting things; Hopes, dreams, successes, comforts, good health, wonder, and joy.

But when I thought about this concept a little more, it became apparent that a full life really means a complete life. A full life isn’t void of challenges, setbacks, failures, discomforts, poor health, and learning. These are natural events we all experience. If I consider the full collection of events in my life, I see a more full and abundant experience.

What about an abundant work life?

I believe the same principle applies to my career. Having my job to the full, or having an abundant work life, means there will be days when I love my job and days when I am uncomfortable with it. There will be times of accomplishment, reward, and achievement. There will also be times of failure and setback.

A complete work-life includes deeper experiences such as servanthood, humility, courage, disappointment, and frustration. My acceptance of the spectrum of experiences determines just how much I accept the concept of having a job to the full. I love the work I do; All of it.

Onward and upward!

The data we see

What we see

When I was an intern in college I worked as a desktop service technician for computer support. I remember an internal financial auditor on the fourth floor of my building that I would occasionally help. Reese was much older than me, but took time to talk to me about life as I fixed his computer. I wish I would have appreciated it more at the time, but I was young and learning my way in a corporate environment.  I thought about him recently because the world of auditing and compliance is changing rapidly in the areas of security and availability of data. While Reese was making sure our company followed GAAP for our financial books I wonder what he would think about compliance controls for information security.

Our news feeds are filled with incidents, thefts, and breaches of company assets involving personal and protected information. A whole new generation of auditors is here to check compliance with controls for how we protect data like credit card numbers, health records, and education records. Identity thieves and hackers have created a gold-rush in recent years to steal data bits that when assembled correctly tell them about you and me. Digital gold.

What we do with it

Today, I have to answer the auditor’s questions about controls in the audit. Unlike my time with Reese, I’m no longer part of the auditor’s day to fill time with a nice break and chit-chat. When I am answering an audit, I often try to really understand the basis of a control or as I as the “spirit” of what the control is trying to achieve (auditors don’t always like this, they’re often a bit stiff).

But here’s my take. The essential question behind the myriad of compliance controls is “what do we do with and how do we protect the data we see in our jobs?”  The intention of the controls is to modify our behaviors to take greater care of the data we see. To do this we have to modify our behavior to treat the data we see like our personal accounts. That means we have to consider who has access to the data. We have to consider the classification of the data we see (confidential, private, restricted, public, etc.) and take action to protect the data in storage and transit.

Thieves rely on our inconveniences to be successful. Restricting access to data in storage and transit is rarely convenient. It requires we think, classify, and take action. It could mean we need to password protect a file, use a secure site for sending a file to a customer, or check to make sure the network folder is only accessible to people in our immediate workgroup. But it doesn’t stop there; sometimes we need to challenge people asking for information.  Tailgating and phishing are made possible because it is uncomfortable for us to challenge people.

Behaviors worth changing

One thing is certain. We are stewards of the data we see each day. Our customers expect us to treat the data with confidentiality and care as if it were own personal data. Forming good habits in data security is worth a little bit of hassle. So here are some practical steps I can offer to help us be better stewards of the data we see each day at work:

  • Take the annual Information and Security Awareness training seriously. Much of the information will repeat each year, but it serves as reinforcement for good habits and the tactics used by thieves.
  • Be cognizant of the data we handle. Classify the data and treat it accordingly. This may mean marking the data classification on documents, storing data in secure places, or using encrypted controls for transferring data to others.
  • Challenge others who ask for access to data. Make sure they truly need access to the data to complete their assigned job function. Make sure they understand the classification of the data.

It’s rarely convenient. But it’s worth the effort.

Onward and upward!

Photo credit: Robert Couse-Baker via creative commons

More or Less?

Truth.

There will always be more work to do than is possible to accomplish by my team.

Think more. Whine less.

Earlier this year I penned some thoughts about thinking through resource contention, Do more with what you have!, because I was looking for better ways to address resource contention than to simply say more people are needed. Getting stuff done is as much a mindset as it is a collection of work output. I’ve learned that when I am overwhelmed with size of the backlog of tasks then the frequency of my output decreases.

In the book, ReWork,  Fried and Hansson address the value of staying lean with less,

“I don’t have enough time/money/people/experience.” Stop whining. Less is a good thing. Constraints are advantages in disguise. Limited resources force you to make do with what you’ve got. There’s no room for waste. And that forces you to be creative. “

Do I believe that? The words do inspire me to look at my backlog through a different set of lenses. One thing I know is this. If I’m able to produce consistent output that adds value to the customer and mission of my team then conversations about the priority of the backlog are easier.

In the book Blue Ocean Strategy, Kim and Mauborgne say it this way,

“instead of getting more resources, tipping point leaders concentrate on multiplying the value of the resources they have.”

The Theory of Constraints management paradigm teaches us to first find the constraint within a process and then to exploit the constraint by shifting resources, managing work queues, and possibly adding capacity. With this lense, value is unlocked by first examining the underlying process instead of trying to add more people.

More or less?

As I sit writing this, I’m led to these conclusions:

More is contentment with less because having less allows me to get more done.

Less is obsession about more, because having more often leads to getting less done.

Onward and upward!