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Scribble Scrabble

Scribble Scrabble?

Two thoughts collided during my self-reflection this week. It started with an article from David Pierce at the Wall Street Journal about handwriting. Pierce explores the effects of the digital world on our penmanship scribble scrabble. He provides a well-framed set of options for getting the written word into electronic format. But Pierce also mentions the positive effects of handwriting on our ability to learn and remember information. When we type on a computer, we are prone to record each word while with writing we will summarize thoughts.

Then I remembered an article I wrote a few years ago about taking pen and paper to meetings rather than laptops. This is my preference because it helps me focus on the meeting rather than distractions of multitasking on my computer. Business meetings would be far more productive if no one was distracted by their laptops!

What insights can we learn from the value of handwritten notes and focused interactions?

Word Play.

I already use a paper notebook to record thoughts and action items throughout the day. While a pad of paper helps  me stay focused at the meeting table, I’m also a keyboard-junkie. I want everything important in electronic format so I can index for searching. I can type faster than I can write and electronic information provides efficiency.

In his article, Pierce discusses taking pictures of hand-written notes and allowing modern technology to recognize the characters for indexing and searching. I love the simplicity of this solution because it removes logistical challenges with writing electronically. It also works for meeting content on whiteboards.

When I write,  I prefer print over cursive. I don’t recall when I made that change, but I remember writing in cursive during high-school to capture notes faster. Print is better for optical character recognition software and gives clarity and precision to my documents. Maybe i’m slower writing print. But it’s legible and precise.

Find time to wrestle with the concepts of note taking, productivity, handwriting if you haven’t already. You might discover some hidden insights about yourself.

Onward and upward!

The Free Spirit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Free Spirit

He never met a day without a smile

People, places, walking – life dance

Touching, smelling, tasting – soul fuel

Waiting, looking, anticipating – momentary rest

 

He opened our eyes to living

Risk-taker, rule-breaker, trouble-maker – boundary pusher

Confidant, sidekick, attendant – trusted companion

Worry-free, optimist, loyal – life teacher

 

He runs free with joy evermore

Memories, impressions, stories – Thank you friend

New places, different smells, no pain – Run friend run

No regrets, satisfied, triumphant – Your spirit is with us

 

In Memory of Brady (2004-2018)

 

 

 

 

All I ever needed to know about information security awareness training

This week I completed the annual information security awareness training module. This material is now required for every employee of the company as part of the growing compliance controls for information security. Over the past several years, the core content in the training has changed little. So I’m thankful the group making our content updates the modules to give it a fresh look-and-feel each year.

It occurred to me, as I listened to the audio of the training content, I could summarize information security awareness with three important principles I learned as a young child:

  1. Don’t talk to strangers

The most prevalent way criminals steal sensitive information is by taking advantage of our good nature. In fancy-speak, the term is social engineering. The most common examples we experience today are email and phone messages asking us to respond or click. Some attempts I receive are comical, but in recent years they’ve become better disguised. The simplest action is to not respond to any unsolicited communication. But, if you think it’s legitimate, then contact the person or organization on your terms via channels they establish.

  1. Know your address

I remember as a young child learning my address and phone number. It was part of my identity and something I had at all-times. In information security we prove our identity by wearing identification badges and signing-in at security checkpoints. ID badges are helpful in large building settings so everyone can distinguish me from a visitor or contractor. In simplest terms,  Knowing my address and who lives/works with me, increases my chances of staying safe.

  1. Treat others as you want to be treated

Earlier this year I wrote about the data we see and are exposed to at work. In today’s information age, the most valuable asset we protect is information about people in our systems. This could be employee data or data about other people our customers share with us. Information security training covers several classifications for data, including NPI, PII, PHI, and PCI. But the key concept is the same in all cases. We should protect and hold this data confidential. In simple terms, we should treat others data as we would want them to treat our personal data. It’s an extension of the Golden Rule relevant in our information driven society.

Long live moms and kindergarten teachers.

Onward and upward!

(Photo credit: Public Domain Image)

Media subscriptions – Where do you spend your media dollars?

A recent article in the Wall Street Journal about Bloomberg charging for access to their content reminded me digital content providers are competing for my wallet-share. In 2015 I cut the cord with cable/satellite and haven’t regretted it. Now, the digital content I consume for video is based on month-to-month subscriptions. I choose the content valuable to me or that I consider worth paying for. No obligations. Easy. My current list:

Increasingly, news and media providers are also moving to subscription models for their digital content. As the number of subscribers for paper content decreases the media outlets need sources of revenue to sustain themselves. Currently, I don’t pay for online news, data analysis, and opinion articles. I still retrieve news on the internet from ad-only sites, teaser rates, or free allowances. To be fair, I listen to some news on the radio or through a XM satellite subscription. I do enjoy in-depth and good analysis on topics. I just haven’t settled on a favorite to lock-in.

What does that mean for all of us now and in the future? As more providers move toward subscription models, we’ll have to make choices on our media subscriptions to keep our overall spending in-check. How much will brand loyalty influence our decisions?  For me initially, I chose Sling TV as an online streaming provider. After a couple of years I switched to PS Vue based on different in programming packages for live sports. But with Netflix, I haven’t really actively shopped them for alternative providers like Hulu and Amazon.  Have I developed brand loyalty to Netflix? If I pay for a subscription to the New York Times (which I don’t) would I not pay for a subscription to additional online new providers like Bloomberg and the Washington Post?

Where do you spend your media dollar?