A Business Technology Place

Click-to-run video and ad content in 2017

Most of the time when I browse and consume content on internet pages I’m trying to scan and read. Ads and videos that automatically start playing are more of a nuisance. They produce noise, delay the page from loading, and require I scroll through the page to stop them.  Last year I disabled flash player content from playing automatically in my Chrome browser by disabling plugin in the settings.

To do this type following in the web address bar: chrome://plugins/

Then disable the player but make sure the box is checked to allow it to run.

Now a page that has videos that automatically load displays this

Microsoft, Google, and Mozilla have announced plans to disable flash by default on future releases of their browsers. The reasons that drive this decision are performance and security. I’d like to add nuisance reduction as well 😉

 

Onward and upward!

Confessions from using Mac Linux Windows Chrome Android iOS

I’ve used them all.confession

Call me an equal opportunity technologist. I’ve given them all a try. From Windows to Linux and everywhere in between. Do I have my have opinions? Absolutely. Do I participate in the “Holy wars” for OS? Yes, on occasion, for entertainment in my life. So I thought it would be fun to write a few confessions about my experience. It’s purely for entertainment. 🙂

Mac OS

  • The ultimate OS right? Yet so many run Windows Parallels and I find that ironic.
  • I inherited a MacBook hand-me-down from daughter. To my frustration, Apple capped the MacOS upgrade level. It also ran super hot around the power cord connector so I had to download a special app for fan control and heat. I found these were common complaints via internet search. In the end, it was not a great experience.
  • Can we just agree on keyboard keys and shortcuts please?
  • Many Mac OS X zealots may not realize that  Mac OS is a Unix based operating system.
  • While viruses aren’t as prevalent on Mac OS. Mac OS is not immune to viruses as some have told me with a smirk.

Windows

  • Oh please Mr. PC tell me why you get slower with age? If your registry is bloated then give me a way to release the blockage please.
  • A breeding ground for viruses. Virus scanners are pricey and taxing to system performance.
  • Windows XP and IE 6. A match made in heaven and a marriage that outlived many attempts to kill it.
  • I have confirmed how long it takes my PC to boot in the morning. I turn it on. Then I go to the break room to put my lunch away and to get a cup of coffee. When I return, it’s ready to go. That’s Windows 7 and a platter based disk. (I’ve seen better with Windows 8 and a SSD.)
  • Windows 8? I get it.

Ubuntu Linux

  • It gave a few of my old PCs new life because it has less hardware requirements than Windows.
  • You can’t beat the price!
  • Software availability isn’t the best. Open Office has the basic features needed for word processing and spreadsheets. But it can lack the advanced features for power users and may not fully read a document prepared in MS Office.
  • Support is plentiful on internet forums. But I’ll admit, you have to be a geek to understand it.

Chrome OS

  • You’re right Google. I mostly just need a browser to complete my computing activities.
  • Google Docs is great. But just wait until someone passes a MS Office document to your non-techy spouse using a ChromeBook.
  • Boot-up time is amazing.
  • It’s really a “cloud” terminal.

Android

  • It works well for me because I’m in the Google ecosystem. Google docs, Gmail, Google contacts, Google+ and Google Voice.
  • Performance tends to lag at times. But I realize it’s tough to make judgements on this. Google doesn’t lock and control the hardware. So many combinations, so many possibilities.
  • Android phones don’t focus on simplicity. Some customizations can be hard to find, like speed dial and email account setup.

iOS

  • It’s not perfect as some make it out to be.
  • My daughter had reception problems from a dorm room in the basement of a building. I asked her to use wifi-calling, but found out it’s not supported yet. I’ve been using that for years on my Android device.
  • The marketing at Apple is the best. I’m not an Apple fan-boy, but their ads have won over an allegiance and created a brand title wave.
  • Let’s be honest, Apple die-hards are a bit snobby.

Infinite Storage

I received an email this week from Google with their latest offer on cloud storage. It’s a good one, targeted at business and group users of the Google Apps platform.

Google Apps, now with infinite space    

We’re excited to announce a new option for Google Apps customers: the full suite of productivity tools plus unlimited* file storage and Vault to protect critical business information. It’s a simple way for teams to share, sync and access all their files from everywhere.

For $10/user/month, upgrade now to Google Apps with unlimited storage and Vault. It also includes other business features to help your organization grow, like 99.9% guaranteed email uptime, 24/7 customer support and the freedom to add as many users as you want. To make the switch, sign in to your Admin console and click Upgrade now. Then click Billing and select Upgrade to Google Apps Unlimited. Please note that downgrading to Google Apps without unlimited storage is not an option at this time.

Wow! “Infinite storage”.  What a title. I can just see the Google marketing team grinning ear-to-ear when they received approval for that offer. It’s not surprising to me though. As space devices have become cheaper, online providers like Google, Apple, and Microsoft have lowered their cloud storage prices and increased the amount of space consumers and businesses get for free.

When I was in college in the early 90s a professor told us that in the future the hardware would be free as a commodity and people would pay for the value in the software.  Computer prices have definitely dropped since then, although not quite to free. But now I see his statement coming true in terms of disk space.

What’s really driving cloud storage is the ability of our electronic devices to share and pull from the same storage. Phone, laptop, tablet, and computer can all pull from the same storage. So cloud storage is really like universal storage. It’s fast, cheap, and easy.  The question is which eco-system will we live in? Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, and others are all competing for our attention.  That competition is now bringing us “infinite storage” offers.  Sweet! To infinity and beyond!

Finding social rhythms

We have limits on the number of digital profiles we can keep active.
I have six digital profiles that I use regularly for various purposes. Here’s the list in no order of significance: Blog site, RSS reader, Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook. My activity on each varies from week-to-week based on a variety of factors including my schedule and purpose of communication. I’m not closed minded to changing in the future. But at this point in time those are the areas that comprise my digital life.

I don’t know for sure, but I suspect six digital areas are far more than most people try to maintain. I’m not active on Pinterest or Instagram or (insert your favorite site not listed here). It’s not that I wouldn’t enjoy learning and exploring, but my capacity to participate is limited by my other choices.

Our digital participation is subject to change.
I think we all gravitate towards the spaces that give us the most value. By that I mean, a place where we connect with people and information. This is a place that we can consume information that provides knowledge and benefit to us, but it’s also a place that allows us to contribute information back to the space.

We may create profiles and try them for a time before abandoning the profile for something else. Twitter is a good example. I see abandoned profiles all the time. Many have created a Twitter account to see what it’s all about but have never contributed any information on their own. LinkedIn is another good example. One could argue it’s a professional expectation now to have a LinkedIn profile. But most people don’t use LinkedIn for professional activity such as networking, knowledge share, or research until they are actively pursuing a job.

We develop social rhythms based on the platform and content.
Maybe you don’t think of it that way. But we are all creatures of habit. I know I try to find a rhythm for producing and consuming digital content. It’s a challenge and requires dedication each day. As I see it though, my digital lifestyle is about learning, thinking, and growing. Even though contributing content isn’t directly related to my compensation at work, keeping an expertise and knowledge molds my thinking and knowledge for work activities.

Here’s some examples from my routine:
* My RSS feed is like my newspaper. It contains profiles of information sources that I want to read regular updates. Some of them are media outlets while others are blogs from individual thought leaders.

* LinkedIn is a always-on professional networking forum. I can keep track of my professional connections changing jobs, adding skills, or sharing pieces of information.

* Google+ is like combination of a RSS reader and discussion forum. I’ve created circles based on topics and when I view the stream from an individual topic it’s like reading a RSS feed. I’m finding that Google+ is more rich with discussion about topics than a typical blog or media publication. Much of the value of Google+ comes in reading and participating in the comments after each post.

* My blog is a my thought sandbox. I use the blog to record my thoughts, practice writing, and experiment with digital publication.

Platforms may come and go. But our basic need to communicate doesn’t change.
Regardless of what digital platform(s) we use or how we use them, we are driven by a need to communicate. “Social media” is just a term to wrap around social creatures. Maybe the current platform we use is discontinued in the future. But we’ll find another one to use because of our basic need to communicate ideas with one another. How much or how little we contribute is based on our rhythm for consumption.

I’m always searching for ways to stay in rhythm or to develop a more complete set of habits in my life. Let me know what works for you.

Moving from Webinars to Hangouts

Hanging out isn’t just for youths anymore.
It was perhaps, your favorite thing to do in high school. You left home to meet a group friends. Your mom asks “what are you going to do?”, and you reply “Oh, nothing really, just hangout.” Now, years later you’re reading, hearing, watching, or even participating in a new kind of hangout. A Google+ digital Hangout.Google+ Hangouts

This hangout spans social and business boundaries.
What’s nice about the Google+ Hangouts is they are taking on meaningful business roles. The media uses them to discuss current news topics. Google uses them for interviews to draw fans closer to book authors and musicians. Politicians are using them for town hall meetings. Musicians use Hangouts to announce new albums.

When will business webinars change?
This week I ran a business webinar for some colleagues. We used the Cisco Webex service to show a slide deck and had a conference call dial-in. That’s been the norm for many years. The format is main-stream and provides comfort for presenter and audience. Presenters can have some level of disorganization and error correction without a visual to the audience, while the audience can multi-task without anyone else knowing. This format provides safety because participants can’t see each other.

But how much more powerful could a video hangout be with closer interactivity with participants? Just imagine seeing the speaker and a few of the participants and creating more of an environment of dialogue rather than presenting. So much of communication is with body language and facial expression, that this type of format is ripe with opportunity.

Barriers.
But change means barriers and most people resist change. Here are a few barriers to Google+ Hangout adoption that I have noticed.

  1. It’s a different mindset and people react differently when you tell them you want to put them on camera. For the participant it means they have to pay attention (no multi-tasking). For the speaker it means keeping a professional appearance and focus on the participants as well as the the content.
  2. With the accessibility and relatively low cost of high bandwidth today video streaming should not present a problem for most. It’s more likely a business participant will be blocked by some social media firewall policy. That’s too bad and it’s time for business policies to catch-up on how people and businesses are using social media sites to make relevant connections.
  3. Google+. I’m a user and fan of the social platform. But many people still are not. Unfortunately, when I’ve tried to talk to others about it they have never even seen or used the site. What that means is if you tell them that Google+ is hosting a webcast event it makes them less likely to even try to view it. I think this will change over time and Google continues to report increased usage of the Google+ platform.

Solutions.
How can businesses overcome these barriers and take advantage of this tool for business interactions that create conversation, create leads, and show industry knowledge?

  1. Look at how other businesses are using Hangouts. A few examples:

a. Google Play hangs with Steven Spielberg and Joseph Gordon-Levitt about their movie Lincoln.

b. The New York Times chats with an olympic athlete.

c. NASA discusses innovation with the public.

  1. This post from Fraser Cain with tips and tricks for Google+ Hangouts has become a living post. Interested parties continue to add comments to the post. It gives a great overview of things to consider when providing live broadcasts.
  2. Sell employees on the value of live video interactivity and dialogue with customers. Can it create more qualified sales leads? Does it show an added level of subject matter involvement? Is it more engaging?
  3. Use the Hangout for live and recorded information distribution. The great thing about Hangouts is you can use them live with an audience that wants to participate in the topic at-hand. But then you can also use them as a recorded playback for others to see. Interaction is still possible for recorded play back in the comments section of a blog post, YouTube video, Google+ post, etc.

I’m interested to know if you have started experimenting with Hangouts. What uses have you found within the business world.