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My next book to read just got hacked

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe.

I have a confession to make. I find it difficult to select my next book to read. It usually goes something like this. Open either the Kindle app or local library app on my tablet. Stare at category headers like fiction, history, and business. Decide on casual or serious reading. Then start scrolling through books, reading summaries, and reviews. Hopefully, I feel good about a selection and begin.

Part of my challenge is I enjoy both casual and serious reading. I define these as:

  1. Casual Reading is for fun, entertainment, or to relax.
  2. Serious Reading is for learning and thinking.

A third type of reading but less common is purposeful.  

  1. Purposeful Reading is to find, record, and retain information about a topic.

Casual reading is relaxing but also stimulates creativity. Serious reading deep dives a topic and promotes alternative thinking. Depending on my mood, I enjoy both. Maybe I should just let Alexa decide for me??

Substitutes.

With the advancement of digital media, digital players are now ubiquitous.  Options for content include podcasts, blogs, news reports, and video documentaries. It’s to the point that I consider some non-book digital content to be a substitute for books because it fits my categories of casual and serious reading. I may be listening rather than reading, but I’m still consuming content that can be both educational and relaxing.

The blog from Mitch Joel  and Podcasts from Gemba Academy are as compelling and thoughtful as a serious read but in smaller segments. The podcast from the Wharton Business School called Moneyball provides a blend of both casual and serious content. How I built this podcast contains information from entrepreneurs just as informative as a biography but with an added twist to hear the story story in first person voice.

I’m not giving up my love of reading. But I’m finding these modern alternatives satisfy some of the same hungers for learning and entertainment. It’s good to have choices.

Alexa, read a book to me!

Onward and upward!

Alexa, play my podcast

How hard can it be?

This week I wanted to play a podcast through my Amazon Echo Dot. It seemed so simple. I would have Alexa learn a skill for a podcast player and then queue the podcast to play. My preferred podcast player is Google Play Music because that’s where I keep my digital music. But I had forgotten Amazon and Google don’t play together. Silly boys.

Here are the options I found:

  1. Enable a skill on Alexa that plays podcasts. Some of the more well-known providers are iHeartRadio, TuneIn, and Stitcher.
  2. Use the Echo Dot as a bluetooth speaker. In this option, the Echo Dot can be paired to another device such as phone or tablet. Then play the podcast on the app installed on the other device.

Pick and go

For option 1, I didn’t want to register a new account. Since I don’t have accounts on iHeartRadio, TuneIn, or Stitcher I chose option 2.

Pairing the Echo Dot to my phone was easy. I turned on bluetooth on my phone and then said “Alex, pair bluetooth”. When I did this the Echo Dot showed as a device that could be paired. The obvious downside to this method is I have to use a second device to play the podcast through the Echo Dot instead of using the Alexa voice commands. I’m OK with that.

One thing to note if you try this. Other family members might not like your podcast content or want to listen at the same time. You might have to move Alexa to a private space. 🙂

Onward and upward!

Photo credit: F. Delventhal via Creative Commons